The Need for Black Women Build – Baltimore is…Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit proin habitant morbi cum, luctus quisque mauris iaculis tincidunt aliquet quis mus sollicitudin penatibus auctor fringilla, tempus praesent taciti primis eget (your words here? I think some sort of introduction here would be good)

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racial_wealthgap_reuters-Lucas-Jackson
Job seekers stand in line to attend the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. career fair held by the New York State Department of Labor. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)

The Average Black Family Would Need 228 Years to Build the Wealth of a White Family Today

Joshua Holland, The Atlantic

read article 

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Insightcced.org | Mariko Chang
Mariko Chang | Insightcced.org

Insight Center for Community Economic Development released a report almost 10 years ago ‘Lifting as We Climb’ that found Black women’s median wealth ranged between $0-$100.

read report PDF

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Insight logo + The_Duke_Samuel_DuBois_Cook-center-on-social-equity logo
Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity and Insight Center for Community Economic Development | socialequity.duke.edu

A newer 2017 report entitled ‘Women, Race & Wealth’ from the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity and Insight Center for Community Economic Development found that Black women still fall behind in every category of wealth accumulation. While income is mainly used for daily necessities, wealth constitutes resources that improve life chances.

read report PDF

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Baltimore City Health Department logo
Baltimore City Health Department

2017 Neighborhood Health Profile / Upton/Druid Heights – Baltimore City Health Department

read report PDF

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The Racial Wealth Divide Initiative at Proserity Now (formerly CFED)
The Racial Wealth Divide Initiative | prosperitynow.org

Racial Wealth Divide Data Profiles / The Racial Wealth Divide Initiative at Prosperity Now (formerly CFED) developed this profile to better understand how racial economic inequality affects Baltimore. This profile is also one of the first steps taken under the Building High Impact Nonprofits of Color project, funded by JPMorgan Chase. This project aims to advance best practices and strengthen resources for nonprofits of color.

read profile PDF

This project is supported in part by:

DHCD logo

BWGC-logo

OSI Fellow 2018

Robert W. Deutsch

Euler-Hermes-logo greyscale

dhcd logo - BWBB Sponsor

Black Women Build-Baltimore is committed to equal employment, participation, and volunteer opportunity without regard to age, ancestry, disability, national or ethnic origin, race, religious belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, political belief, or veteran status.

This project is supported in part by:

BWGC-logo

OSI Fellow 2018

Robert W. Deutsch

DHCD logo

dhcd logo - BWBB Sponsor

Euler-Hermes-logo greyscale

This project is supported in part by:

BWGC-logo

OSI Fellow 2018

Robert W. Deutsch

DHCD logo

dhcd logo - BWBB Sponsor

Euler-Hermes-logo greyscale

Black Women Build-Baltimore is committed to equal employment, participation, and volunteer opportunity without regard to age, ancestry, disability, national or ethnic origin, race, religious belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, political belief, or veteran status.
Black Women Build-Baltimore is committed to equal employment, participation, and volunteer opportunity without regard to age, ancestry, disability, national or ethnic origin, race, religious belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, political belief, or veteran status.